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TETELESTAI | 1-800 Numbers

This is where the 800#'s will be listed which will be included in the TETELESTAI post once published.

(Note: The TETELESTAI post is the official "Go" for redemption/exchange. Despite Yosef's departure, it will still be sent out for publication when the time comes.)

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Featured Post

RV Intel/Thoughts/News - All Posts for December 9, 2016

Below is a list of all of the content posted for Friday, December 9, 2016. This will be useful for those of you who may have missed somethin...

Saturday, November 19, 2016

Dinar Updates Daily Chat Log for Saturday 11/19/16 - Part 2

Dinar Updates Daily Chat Log

Part 2 - Featuring BGG & rcookie

DIGIman1 says(7:39 AM):

Where do forest rangers go to "get away from it all?"

BGG says to loop(7:40 AM):

That is so true!!

rcookie says to BGG(7:41 AM):

4 MORE F-16'S DELIVERED.....

loop says to rcookie(7:41 AM):

Actions always speak louder then words and what they are getting done is awesome!

BGG says to rcookie(7:43 AM):

Those don't show up unless things are SERIOUSLY HUNKY DORY!!

rcookie says to BGG(7:43 AM):

EXACTLY....REMEBER SALEHS QUOTE...THE TIME HAS COME FOR DEEDS AND NOT WORDS....

loop says to rcookie(7:43 AM):

(y)

BGG says to rcookie(7:43 AM):

ECU's on Weapons of War are like IMPOSSIBLE...

BGG says to rcookie(7:44 AM):

(Woops - EUC's)

rcookie says to BGG(7:45 AM):

Iraqi army received four planes "F 16" of America

MIDDLE EAST

Last updated since 16 minutes.

ccording to a ministry statement that the aircraft, "she said to the Iraqi Air Force strike force will accelerate in defeating terrorist organizations and the liberation of every inch of the land of Iraq Weldensae terrorism, because of its planes of combat power and access to their objectives and destroyed with high accuracy also has the potential of e ensure the protection and control of airspace Iraqi. "

Through the commander of the Iraqi air force on "high confidence of Iraqi pilots who will lead these aircraft after receiving their training in the United States for more than four years."

rcookie says to BGG(7:45 AM):

:D

(7:59 AM)dreamway was kicked out by dreamway!

(8:00 AM)THE OBSERVER - http://www.dinarupdates.com/observer/ - Save as a favorite... for Daily Dinar Commentary, Notices and Call banners!!

magnetlady says(8:03 AM):

Good morning everyone

jtank says(8:05 AM):

maggs

magnetlady says(8:07 AM):

morning jtank

rcookie says to magnetlady(8:07 AM):

GM MISS MAGS!!!.......

(8:08 AM)magnetlady changed nickname to *.MOD.magnetlady!

DIGIman1 says(8:08 AM):

mornin mags

magnetlady says(8:08 AM):

RCookie, see you are bringing it -- even early this morning.

magnetlady says(8:08 AM):

hey DIGI

magnetlady says(8:09 AM):

I slept in today. Still can't get rid of that sinus so need to work on that this week.

(8:09 AM)plowboy was kicked out by plowboy!

rcookie says(8:10 AM):

EVERYONE REMEMBER THE ARTICLE COUPLE OF MINUTES AGO REGARDING CALLS FOR CHANGING THE LAWS TO PROTECT FOREIGN INVESTORS INTERESTS AND CONDUSIVE LANDSCAPE.......

rcookie says(8:11 AM):

FDI...FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT AND THE LAWS SUPPORTING..

rcookie says to magnetlady(8:11 AM):

(y)

rcookie says(8:12 AM):

OK.....HAVE SOMETHING THAT REALLY EXPLAINS AND OUTLINES EXACTLY WHAT THEY QRE TALKING ABOUT.....

loop says to rcookie(8:13 AM):

Does it require reading??

rcookie says to loop(8:15 AM):

:D

rcookie says to loop(8:16 AM):

IT IS FROM OECD ORGANIZATION FOR ECONOMIC COOPERATION & DEVELOPMENT...

rcookie says(8:16 AM):

New Generationof Foreign Investment Laws:MENA-OECD Good Practice and the New Iraqi Investment Regime

rcookie says(8:17 AM):

THIS IS FROM THE INTRODUCTION.......AND IS AWESOME..........

rcookie says(8:18 AM):

REQUIRED DU READING...........

rcookie says(8:18 AM):

1. Under international public law, states are sovereign in determining the entry and stay of foreigners including foreign investors. In the global market place, however, countries compete to attract high value- added foreign investment as a key development tool for their economies. In order to effectively make use of their sovereign rights and concurrently attract much needed intra-regional and other foreign investment, a new generation of foreign investment laws1 are currently emerging in Middle East and North Africa (MENA) countries participating in the MENA-OECD Investment Programme.

2. Qatar (2000), Yemen (2002), Saudi Arabia (2000), Algeria (2001), and Kuwait (2003) have revised their investment laws recently. Egypt has issued a substantial revised law in 2005 and a new Syrian investment law entered into force in 2007. Iraq issued a new federal investment law in the summer of 2006. Morocco, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Oman are considering revising their current investment laws. Jordan‟s revised investment law is pending parliamentary approval, and some countries are considering revising their investment regimes in light of emerging international good practice. Finally, other countries (for example Bahrain) do not regulate foreign investment through a special law, but deal with foreign investment regulation issues as a part of their overall commercial law.

rcookie says(8:20 AM):

3. Ministers and delegations from 16 MENA countries concluding the first Ministerial meeting of the MENA-OECD Investment Programme in February 2006 have recognised in a Ministerial Declaration “openness to foreign investment and access by investors to facilities necessary for investment and the movement of key personnel for the purpose of investment” as good practice. The Ministerial Declaration equally recognises the principles of “national treatment for established foreign investments, fair and equitable treatment of investment, protection of investors rights and compensation for all categories of expropriation”.2

rcookie says(8:21 AM):

4. As a matter of fact, MENA countries‟ restrictions on foreign ownership of enterprises have been relaxed, as have restrictions on foreign ownership of land and real estate, and on foreign purchases of shares in local stock markets. In many MENA countries, foreigners can participate in the privatisation of state- owned enterprises.

rcookie says(8:22 AM):

5. Figure 1 demonstrates, however, that for selected MENA countries (Algeria, Egypt, Morocco, Qatar, KSA, Tunisia) the regulatory restrictiveness for Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in the business services, telecommunications, construction, distribution, finance, tourism, transport and electricity sectors is still above the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries‟ average and certainly above the OECD countries‟ minimum. Figure 1 is based on the OECD‟s FDI Regulatory Restrictiveness Index computed for 29 OECD countries and extended by United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) to cover six MENA countries. 3

rcookie says(8:22 AM):

6. The indicators primarily aim to measure deviations from „national treatment‟, i.e. discrimination against foreign investment expressed in laws, regulations, and schedules of international agreements to which the country is a party to (for example General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), OECD Declaration on International Investment, and OECD Codes on Liberalisation of Capital Movements), rather than to measure the institutional environment and administrative practices in general.

rcookie says(8:23 AM):

7. The Index scores foreign direct equity investment restrictions, screening and approval procedures and other restrictions including nationality requirements for boards of directors, movement of personnel, domestic content and other performance requirements. Entry restrictions are weighted particularly high and scores are attributed for all sectors mentioned, where 1 equals closed and 0 equals open.

rcookie says(8:24 AM):

8. Against this background, the new generation of investment laws emerging in MENA countries and in most emerging market economies, demonstrate a tendency to further converge with OECD average standards of liberalisation of investment entry requirements. This does not, of course, imply that restrictions, screening, and approval procedures for foreign investment will be completely abolished. Rather, it means that remaining restrictions to FDI tend to become more transparent and converge towards an international best practice standard.

rcookie says(8:24 AM):

9. Over the past 20 years, most countries followed the shift from an approach which restricted the entry of FDI to an approach which maintains a limited number of sectoral restrictions or has no specific regulation for foreign investors (Exhibit 1).

(8:25 AM)bunker54 was kicked out by bunker54!

rcookie says(8:25 AM):

10. Traditionally, total or comprehensive sectoral restrictions to FDI were used by countries pursuing a policy of economic nationalism. The socialist states of Eastern Europe and the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) were the most prominent examples of this approach. This approach has become obsolete today. On the other end of the spectrum stand economies which have little or no specific entry regulations for FDI and follow a stringent national treatment approach, whereby foreign investors are granted the same treatment as domestic investors in like circumstances.

(8:25 AM)bunker54 was kicked out by bunker54!

rcookie says(8:26 AM):

11. Currently, there are hardly any economies in the world which pursue a policy of total exclusion of FDI. Sectoral exclusions of FDI, on the other hand, are a common characteristic of various jurisdictions. Most states have restrictions in sectors which encompass industries relevant to national security, industries regarded as strategic, culturally significant industries and public utilities. An example is the Exxon-Florio amendment which empowers the United States (US) president to prohibit the takeover of a US firm by a foreign firm where there exists „credible evidence that the foreign interest exercising control might take action that threatens to impair national security‟4. Countries trying to enhance the transparency of their regulatory investment regime tend to publish so-called negative lists which allow the investor easy access to information about remaining horizontal or sectoral restrictions to FDI.

(8:26 AM)dreamway was kicked out by dreamway!

rcookie says(8:27 AM):

12. Finally, restrictions on foreign ownership in privatized companies in some countries have been following a so-called „golden share‟ approach whereby the government retains control over certain matters in recently privatised companies. A golden share is a nominal share which is able to outvote all other shares in certain specified circumstances, often held by a government organization, in a government company undergoing the process of privatisation and transformation into a stock-company. The United Kingdom (UK), France and Germany have used this approach in the past.

rcookie says(8:27 AM):

13. Following a period of investment entry liberalisation, relatively few OECD member countries maintain general screening and authorisation procedures for FDI. However, sectoral restrictions are maintained for the protection of security and other essential interests. Recently, existing regulatory frameworks for screening and approval procedures have been used more often in OECD countries to regulate investment in infrastructure and energy sectors as well as investment by enterprises controlled by foreign states (often managed by so-called sovereign funds). The debate on the scope of exceptions to the free entry of foreign investment, following concerns of „national security‟ or „strategic industry,‟ in several OECD countries has re-emerged and led to plans for revisions of foreign investment entry procedures with the aim to potentially tighten requirements.

rcookie says(8:27 AM):

14. With a view to retain a strong liberalised international investment regime, the OECD‟s Investment Committee is currently studying this new tendency in its „Freedom of Investment project‟; the G8 meeting in Heiligendamm 2007 concluded the discussion on investment “with a strong commitment to the freedom of open and transparent investment”.

rcookie says(8:28 AM):

15. The absence of any specific regulatory treatment designed for foreign investment would render investment laws useless. Indeed, some countries in the OECD and in the MENA region made the policy choice to regulate the treatment of foreign investment only in their commercial laws and regulations, either on the basis of full national treatment, or with sectoral and other exceptions. However, many economies striving to attract more high-quality foreign investment, still decide to issue special foreign investment laws, for internal policy reasons, either as a communication tool towards foreign investors, or for other motives.

rcookie says(8:29 AM):

16. Investors are looking for transparency and predictability, especially when investing in countries with regulatory traditions different from their own and where there are no fully modernised institutions and enforcement structures. A „state of the art‟ investment law can serve investors, domestic or foreign, as one among many others indications that the investment climate in a given country is transparent and predictable with respect to issues like regulation of entry, investor guarantees, incentive systems and procedural and legal recourse issues. Domestic best practice investment laws together with binding international investment instruments such as Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs), World Trade Organisation (WTO) obligations, investment chapters of Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) and the OECD Declaration on International Investment, can reassure investors that basic standards protecting property rights and administrative treatment are in line with international standards.

rcookie says(8:29 AM):

17.   Figure 1.In this respect, the key themes which are covered in most investment laws encompass:entry regulations including, lists of exceptions to national treatment (refer to the negative list approached alluded to earlier);screening and approval requirements for foreign investments; expropriation/national treatment/free transfer guarantees for investors; potentially a chapter on regulatory/fiscal/financial investment incentives; and,institutional provisions regarding an investment promotion agency or/and a high level investment commissions (see Exhibit 3).

rcookie says(8:30 AM):

18. Many „new generation‟ investment laws of MENA countries follow a „middle ground‟ approach between restricted entry and national treatment regulation of investment; fully open entry with varying degrees of entry regulation; investment encouragement through incentive systems; and, institutional and procedural arrangements with a view to promote investment.

rcookie says(8:30 AM):

II. REGULATION OF ENTRY IN MENA COUNTRIES’ INVESTMENT LAWS

subgirl says to DIGIman1(Whisper message)(8:30 AM):

can I give you a break now :)

rcookie says(8:31 AM):

19. Under international law, every state is sovereign in controlling entry and establishment of foreign entities within its territory. States may exercise this right in different ways as referred to in Exhibit 4. First, there may be restrictions excluding FDI from the whole economy, or from specific sectors and industries. Secondly, FDI may be permitted only after screening and approval procedures have been applied. These procedures may condition investments on the fulfilment of specific performance requirements (e.g. local content and sourcing requirements). They may also serve as selection procedures for the granting of regulatory, financial or fiscal incentives for a foreign investor‟s project.

rcookie says(8:32 AM):

20. The Agreement on Investment and Free Movement of Arab Capital among Arab Countries of 1970, reiterates the principle of sovereignty in Article 3, highlighting each signatory „s sovereignty over its resources and its right to determine the procedures, terms and limits that govern Arab investment.5 Similarly, the Unified Agreement for the Investment of Arab Capital in the Arab States of 1980 controls the rights of entry and establishment6, as does Article 2 of the Agreement on Promotion, Protection and Guarantee of Investments among Member States of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference of 19817.

rcookie says(8:32 AM):

21. The principle that the state is sovereign in controlling entry of FDI into its territory is qualified by international obligations the state has agreed upon. Almost all MENA countries have joined major multilateral agreements covering investment related aspects. As of December 2006, 11 out of the 18 MENA countries and territories participating in the MENA-OECD Investment Programme were members of the WTO. As such, they are obliged to implement the obligations of GATS, Trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights (TRIPs) and Trade-Related Investment Measures (TRIMs). The GATS provides, for certain investors, the right of establishment if the member of the GATS makes specific commitments on market access. TRIPs accords national treatment and „most favoured nation treatment‟ to foreign firms‟ intellectual property rights, while TRIMs provide that certain categories of trade related investment measures infringe the principles of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT).

rcookie says(8:34 AM):

TRIPA TRADE RELATED INTELLECTUAL PROPERT RIGHTS.....AND TRIM..TRADE RELATED INVESTMENT MEASURES...

rcookie says(8:35 AM):

23. Some BITs and a growing number of FTAs grant national treatment already in the entry phase of an investment and thus limit a state‟s discretion to regulate entry. Removal of all discrimination in matters of investors‟ access is required by the US model of BITs, which makes entry into the host state subject to „national treatment‟ and „most favoured nation‟ treatment principles, qualified by the right of each party to adopt or maintain exceptions falling within one of the activities or matters listed in an annex. Other than in BITs concluded with the US or Canada, and BITs and FTAs concluded by Japan, this “negative list” approach can be found in North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the Energy Charter Treaty, and the OECD Codes of Liberalisation. Other multilateral instruments covering investment such as the GATS follow a „positive list‟ approach whereby parties indicate which sectors are open to FDI.

rcookie says(8:35 AM):

4. In order to regulate the entry of FDI, governments can use two distinct regulatory approaches. A „positive list approach‟ explicitly states the sectors of the economy which are, in principle, open to foreign investors. The majority of MENA countries rely on a „positive list‟ approach in presenting their investment environment to foreign investors.

rcookie says(8:36 AM):

25. The second regulatory alternative is for a government to list only the sectors which are closed to FDI – the so called „negative list‟ approach. Certain MENA countries provide such a „list of FDI restrictions‟ outlined in their investment laws or publicly accessible information sources. A list of remaining restrictions to foreign investment gives investors transparent and easily accessible information. This transparent approach is currently followed by Bahrain, Jordan, Qatar, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia, which effectively account for 27% of the 18 Middle Eastern countries participating in the MENA-OECD Investment Programme. With the input of the MENA-OECD Investment Programme, Morocco has also prepared a negative list although it is not included in the current investment framework.

rcookie says(8:37 AM):

Exhibit 4 – Possible Regulatory Approaches to EntryOption 1: Allow full foreign ownership in all sectors full national treatment approach;Option 2: Allow foreign ownership only in specific sectors listed in a „positive list‟;Option 3: Allow foreign ownership, but apply general screening and approval procedures to guarantee compliance with negative list;Option 4: Allow foreign majority ownership, but apply screening and approval procedures (only) for the granting of incentives/imposition of performance requirements (in line with international obligations);Option 5: Allow foreign majority ownership, but apply screening and approval procedures based on specific criteria (national interest, economic development etc) to all incoming investment;Option 6: Combination of 1-5.

rcookie says(8:37 AM):

III. SCREENING AND APPROVAL PROCEDURES

rcookie says(8:38 AM):

26. The regulation of entry for foreign investors relies on the sovereignty to decide on which investment is allowed to enter the country. Entry regulation can also include some form of screening and approval procedures, either horizontally with respect to all investments independent from the sector, or for investment into sectors regarded as sensitive or strategic to an economy. The transparency and predictability of these procedures send a message to potential investors and are therefore important as they create an attractive investment environment.

rcookie says(8:38 AM):

27. Screening and approval procedures involve case-by-case reviews of potential foreign investment projects by a specialised public authority in the host country - often being the investment promotion agency, a special investment committee, or the Ministry responsible for investment. Compulsory approval procedures are in place only in a small number of OECD member countries, but more common in countries which are not members of the OECD. Traditionally, where such authority in charge of screening and approving is in place, there is a relatively wide discretion to decide whether or not to approve a foreign investment project. The new generation of investment laws try to specify the conditions which are supposed to guide the decision of the authority thereby limiting the discretion of the government agency and increasing its transparency.

rcookie says(8:39 AM):

28. Investment screening and approval procedures have been simplified in many MENA countries‟ investment laws. However, despite these improvements, special screening procedures for foreign investment remain in place in a number of countries. In some countries, the motivation behind special procedures for FDI is ultimately to control sources and the nature of incoming investment flows. Other countries, including Egypt and Jordan use screening and approval procedures with a different motive: to decide on whether to grant preferential treatment to foreign investors.

rcookie says(8:39 AM):

29. In general, three scenarios can be detected in the application of FDI screening procedures in the region: in certain countries, all sectors are subject to approval requirements, in others only specific, strategic sectors are subject to such requirements. A third scenario, which is manifested in countries such as Jordan, Egypt or Bahrain is where additional approval procedures are required (as compared with national treatment) when a company wishes to apply for certain incentives under the applicable investment laws.

rcookie says(8:39 AM):

30. While screening of foreign investment is one of the most widely used techniques for controlling the entry and establishment of foreign investors in host states, it can create unnecessary impediments and should be restricted to sensitive sectors. Often, a specialised investment review agency deals with the screening and approval procedure using a process which tends to be highly discretionary, lacking overall transparency and the possibility for an investor to claim effective judicial review. If screening procedures were to remain, MENA countries employing such procedures should consider offering rights of judicial review to investors against decisions by the review agency. A further transparency-enhancing measure could be to issue clear administrative guidelines for the decision-making process so as to increase the predictability of the final decision taken with regard to the investor. It would be also beneficial from the perspectives of transparency and simplicity if all investment screening procedures for foreign investors were included in the general investment law or referred to within the body of the latter.

rcookie says(8:40 AM):

31. A possible good practice approach distilled from OECD and MENA countries‟ investment laws and regulations is described in Exhibit 5. Such an approach to foreign investment entry regulation foresees a transparent „negative list‟ for sectors excluded from foreign investment or sectors for which special screening and approval procedures apply. These screening and approval procedures which should be, if possible, limited only to sensitive or strategic sectors, need to be:

rcookie says(8:40 AM):

31. A possible good practice approach distilled from OECD and MENA countries‟ investment laws and regulations is described in Exhibit 5. Such an approach to foreign investment entry regulation foresees a transparent „negative list‟ for sectors excluded from foreign investment or sectors for which special screening and approval procedures apply. These screening and approval procedures which should be, if possible, limited only to sensitive or strategic sectors, need to be:

rcookie says(8:41 AM):

IV. INVESTOR GUARANTEES

rcookie says(8:41 AM):

32. The February 2006 MENA Ministerial Declaration is complemented by a set of recommendations which have been elaborated by the MENA-OECD Investment Programme.9 These refer to emerging standards in domestic investment regulations as well as in international investment agreements and encompass the following principles protecting private investors:

rcookie says(8:44 AM):

THESE ISSUES ARE EXACTLY WHAT IRAQ IS CHEWING ON AND REFERENCED IN THIS MORNINGS REPORT ABOUT US INVESTOR INTEREST PROTECTION BEING REVISED AND BAKED INTO THE IRAQI FDI LANDSCAPE.............

rcookie says(8:45 AM):

IS THIS HELPFUL.....I KNOW ITS LONG BUT REALLY GIVES INSIGHT TO THE COMPLEXITIES....AND MULTIPLE LAWS...INFLUENCED BY THESE CONCERNS...

rcookie says(8:49 AM):

OK THEN.....

heartland says(8:51 AM):

rcookie..Would it be correct to assume that Iraq as a country has more wealth now than before the devaluation of it's currency and if so, could we read anything into that concerning the future value of the dinar? Thanks

loop says to rcookie(8:57 AM):

Great article.

(9:00 AM)Be sure to join the Dinar Updates “private” FaceBook Group… https://www.facebook.com/groups/571383766355188/ (go here and ask to join… then add some Dinar Friends!!)

rcookie says(9:02 AM):

THE QUANTITY OR STATUS OF THEIR NATIONAL RESOURCE ASSETS IS IMPORTANT... BUT AS FAR AS SUPPORTING AND DRIVING ANY CURRENCY VALUE INCREASE...NOWHERE NEAR AS OMPORTANT AS THESE THINGS THAT ARE NECESSARY TO SUPPORT FDI....AND ACTUALLY ALLOW IRAQ TO DO SOMETHING WITH ITS NEWLY VALUED CURRENCY.......THE FDI IS WHAT WILL DRIVE THE DINAR....

rcookie says(9:04 AM):

WEVE TALKED ABOUT IN CALLS.....THE FDI VOLUME AND SUCCESS IN IRAQ IS WHAT WILL DRIVE TRHE CURRENCY AND ECONOMY...

rcookie says to loop(9:04 AM):

(y)

JR67 says(9:05 AM):

Awesome and terrific News team cookie/loop/bgg and Ms Maggs .....exciting to say the least!

JR67 says(9:06 AM):

Great way to start our day!

JR67 says(9:06 AM):

Thank You

rcookie says(9:06 AM):

THAT REPORT JUST SHOWS SOME OF THE VERY IMPORTANY ISSUES...SOME OF THESE LAWS WE HAVE SEEN AMENDED AND OTHERS STILL LOOKING FOR COMPLETION DEAL WITH....AND WHY SO VERY INTEGRAL IN RECRUITING..CAPTURING AND RETAINING FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT IN IRAQ...

rcookie says(9:09 AM):

THE US INTERESTS AND SENSITIVITIES TOWARD INVESTOR INTEREST PROTECTION...INCLUDING CREDIBLE DISPITE AND ARBITRATION RESOURCES............AND THE FACT THAT THIS IS IN OUT NEWS RIGHT NOW........AND IRAQ WILL BE THE REGIONAL LEADER........

rcookie says(9:10 AM):

SORRY AGAIN SO LONG.....BUT INSIGHTFUL.....

subgirl says to rcookie(9:12 AM):

hey rc GM and thank you :)

(9:13 AM)subgirl changed nickname to subgirlcopy!

Continue to Part 3 | Link to Part 1

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